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Tematica fotografica saptamanala - Perfectioneaza fotograful din tine

Discussion in 'Fotografie' started by florin_mol, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. dromaderu

    dromaderu Active Member

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    Multam de interventie danielpix,
    asa este, ar fi buna o tema,

    daca nu apare nimeni (miram-as) cu altceva,

    as propune ceva de sezon, gen "Iarna!"

    desigur, conform principiului vechi,

    "omu'-gospodar-iarna /car; vara/sanie!"
     
  2. danielpix

    danielpix New Member

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    Eu ma gandeam la orice subiect sau tema, dar sa fie noaptea(sau mai bine zis dupa apus -hipno- ). Ce ziceti? sunt si alte propuneri? -ras4-
     
  3. florin_mol

    florin_mol New Member

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    Parca vorbea cineva la un moment dat de poze cu luna. Se referea la luna de pe cer nu la o poza pe luna :)





    Fotografia e facuta cu powershot g9 in format RAW si prelucrata in PS.
     
  4. AlinaPink

    AlinaPink New Member

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    Buna! Sunt noua pe aici- avand de-abia doar cateva minute, insa am citit topicul acesta fiind si eu un mic fotograf amator.

    Am o idee destul de faina(dupa parerea mea)... ma gandeam acum cateva zile la astro foto... stelele si galaxiile... Mai pe scurt cerul, pe care il consider magic. Daca va place astept aprobari...

    Pana atunci o sa vin si eu cu cateva foto...




    Stiu ca nu am pus focusul chiar pe floare, ci pe coltul din dreapta sus, insa pe parcurs o sa perfectionez...:)




    Aceasta este un pic miscata, insa mie mi-a placut.

    Astept comentariile voastre si ne mai auzim. Pe mai tarziu!
     
  5. florin_mol

    florin_mol New Member

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  6. florin_mol

    florin_mol New Member

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    Mi-a placut veverita din poza a doua.
    Astro fotografie hmmm asta da tema serioasa. Provocarea va si mai mare pentru cei care locuiesc in sau aproape de orase.
    Deasemenea trepiedul este indispensabil la acest gen de foto.
    Am adaugat si ue aici doua fotografii facute in Ceahlau anul trecut.
    Succes.
     
  7. florin_mol

    florin_mol New Member

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    Am obs ca userii au butoane de like pe pagina lor. Ne-m bucura daca am avea "Like"-uri si pe forum in dreptul postarilor.
    Mie imi pare mult mai firesc Like decat Thank you.
    Regards.
     
  8. AlinaPink

    AlinaPink New Member

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  9. AlinaPink

    AlinaPink New Member

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    Pozele sunt foarte faine. Bravo! Insa mie mi-ar fi placut mai mult daca erau mai deep.
    Uite un exemplu:


    [attachment]C:fakepathbtw_cygnus&cepheu.jpg[/attachment]
    sau

    [attachment]C:fakepathbabe_sco.jpg[/attachment]

    Mentionez ca pozele nu imi apartin. Sunt ale unei prietene, Cristina Tinta.
    Follow her on: http://www.cristinatinta.ro/ or http://www.cristinatinta.blogspot.com/
     
  10. florin_mol

    florin_mol New Member

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    Am fost placut surprins de situl cristinei.
    Cristina este un fotograf cu viziune. Nu este doar un fotograf ea poate fi pe viitor si un visual artist.
    Mi-au placut foarte mult unele din fotografii. Unele insa erau prea adanc incadrate in elementul abstractului si deci prin urmare erau probabil prea deep pentru mine. Sunt multi care se numesc fotografi cu numele dar care nu prea ofera nimic nou. Prietena ta nu se incadreaze in acea categorie.
    Ca sa revenim la subiect pentru a face poze astro iti trebuie niste "scule" care din pacate costa cam multisor. Fotografia astro este o nisa destul de subtire a fotografiei cred ca tocmai datorita costurilor implicate.
    Noi aici incercam sa ne alegem subiecte care sa nu necesite investitii majore.
    ;)
     
  11. AlinaPink

    AlinaPink New Member

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    Aseara am primit un articol despre foto care m-a impresionat cu adevarat. Scris de un profesor de fotografie cu multi, multi ani in urma... articolul inca este publicat prin ziare de specialitate. As spune cateva cuvinte despre el, insa va las pe voi sa il descoperiti.
    Mentionez ca este pentru pentru toti fotografii- de la amatori pana la profesionisti.
    Merita citit!


    [attachment]C:fakepathThe Thing Itself.pdf[/attachment]
     
  12. AlinaPink

    AlinaPink New Member

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    Am vazut ca atasamentul nu a fost gasit... -plans-

    Asa ca am sa pun aici articolul in intregime.

    The Thing Itself
    The fundamental principle of photography by Bill Jay

    For more than 30 years I have been deeply involved with the medium of
    photography; for most of that time I have directed my lectures and writings at
    young(er) photographers.
    Hopefully my own attitudes to the medium will continue to evolve; certainly, they
    have undergone continuous change. In looking back at the last three decades,
    however, I have been aware that one fundamental attitude has remained at the
    core of all my experiences in the medium. It is this "frame of reference" which I
    would like to share with you in a single article.
    I am not claiming that this principle of photography is radical, different or new.
    On the contrary. I believe that it is familiar and basic - which means that it
    deserves and demands constant repetition, in an age when principles are often
    impugned, as if they no longer held relevance.
    But like all fixed Rules, it must also be accompanied by flexible strategies,
    accounting for individual images of insight and brilliance which, seemingly, ignore
    the principle we will discuss. But it is there, and no less crucial for being hidden,
    like the foundations of a building.
    Perhaps the most obvious, and therefore the most contentious, issue of
    photography is the medium's inseparable relationship to The Thing Itself.
    Photography performs one function supremely well: it shows what something or
    somebody looked like, under a particular set of conditions at a particular moment
    in time. This specificity has been, and remains, photography's boon as well as
    its bane.
    It was not by chance that photography was born in the early 19 century when a
    deterministic spirit was fueling the Victorian's fanaticism for facts. The camera,
    along with the microscope and the telescope, became one of the primary
    instruments for investigating the details of reality. Deeply and strongly rooted in
    subject matter, the medium has had an uneasy and tenuous alliance with
    authorship since its introduction. Therefore, what a photograph depicts has
    generally taken precedence over what a photograph means.
    The advantage inherent in this notion is that photography has become an
    increasingly useful tool in our society for the transmission of information about
    every conceivable aspect of life.
    The "disadvantage," is that while a photograph is directing attention to its subject,
    it is de-emphasizing the role of the individual who made it. Indeed, in the vast
    majority of photographs, even those of extraordinary impact in our lives, we have
    no knowledge of, or interest in, the author. Attempting to make individualized
    (artistic) photographs in this environment is a bit like discussing metaphysics at a
    football stadium during the Super Bowl. This does not mean that the attempt is
    without value; it may indeed influence your neighbor. But it does mean that the
    chances of being recognized by the public at large is less than likely.
    The act of photography is a similarly private act, unlikely to be rewarded or even
    noticed by society in general. The young photographer must come to terms with
    this fact. A photographer with artistic aspirations has a very small audience -
    one which is increasingly congregating within the faculty at colleges and
    universities. These institutions have replaced the church and the princes as the
    major patrons of the arts in our society. Indeed, about the only way it is possible
    to earn a healthy living from being a photographic artist is to become an
    academic. And this is the primary value in attending graduate school - to earn
    the qualifications necessary to become employed as a college teacher/art
    photographer. In this role, the artist has the freedom to expand his/her creative
    potential.
    I have mentioned the arts in academia in order to throw an oblique light onto a
    previous assertion. It is this: most of the Great Names used in academia, for the
    inspiration and edification of students, would not be eligible for graduate studies,
    let alone as faculty members. Most of them were professional photographers,
    earning their livings on assignment in journalism, industry, fashion, medicine, and
    a host of other photographic applications. My point is that great (even artistic)
    photography is not a function of environment or a prerogative of academia.
    A corollary of this point is that you cannot be a photographer by aspiring to be
    one, or by learning everything there is to be known about photography.
    Photographers produce photographs. And many of them. Like every other skill,
    photography is learned by continuous and dedicated practice.
    One well known photographer came to stay at my home and shocked the local
    photo-dealer by ordering 1,000 cassettes of 35mm film. I assure you that every
    frame had been exposed within one year. That equals an average 100 frames
    per day, seven days a week. Another photographer friend shoots a roll of film
    every day "even when not photographing" because, he says, "it is essential to
    keep the eye in training. " It is true that these two examples are of particular
    types of photographers but nonetheless the principle remains: you do not
    become good at anything unless you do it earnestly, regularly and, yes,
    professionally.
    The truth inexorably leads to a single, but usually ignored, matter of fact: in order
    to photograph with any degree of continuous passion, you must have a
    fascination for the subject, otherwise you cannot sustain an interest in the act of
    creation for a long enough period of time in which to make any insightful or
    original statement about it. In spite of its seemingly heretical slant (in this day
    and age) what you photograph is usually more important than how you
    photograph it.
    The photographer is, first and foremost, a selector of subjects. The
    photographer makes a conscious choice from the myriad of possible subjects in
    the world and states: I find this interesting, significant, beautiful or of value. The
    photographer walks through life pointing at people and objects; the aimed
    camera shouts "look at that!" The photographer produces pictures in order that
    his or her interest in a subject can be communicated to others. Each time a
    viewer looks at a print, the photographer is slaying "I found this subject to
    be more interesting or significant than thousands of other objects I could have
    captured; I want you to appreciate it too. "
    This immediate emotional or intellectual response to the subject matter is at the
    core of photography. Its periphery is the photographer's manipulation of
    framing, focus, exposure, lighting, and all the other variables, in order that a
    bland record is invested with depth through the production of an intriguing image.
    I have stressed the importance of subject matter because it is the fundamental
    principle of photography - and, paradoxically, the least discussed area of the
    medium, especially to young photographers. I can understand this reluctance.
    We all have grandiose aspirations for, and expectations from, photography and
    this leads to a plethora of concepts, as well as aesthetic and critical theories
    which, when heaped on the back of photography, bring the medium to its knees,
    not in homage but in defeat. The fact of the matter is that photography cannot
    bear the intellectual weight with which it is fashionable to burden it. Photography
    is not an intellectual game but an emotional response to charged living.
    After a critical essay of mine appeared in print, Ralph Steiner would often write
    me a funny, provocative and stimulating letter. But he would end with the words:
    "but you still have not told me in which direction to point the camera - and this is
    what matters. " And he is right.
    However, giving specific advice on what to photography would not be
    appreciated even if it was possible. The answer is provided by a question: What
    are you really interested in? In other words: What is it that can sustain your
    enthusiasm for a long time? I advise young photographers to be overly pragmatic
    in answering such questions. First, list all those subjects which fascinate you -
    without regard to photography, i. e. what would you be doing if there was no
    such thing as a camera. After the list is made, you then start cutting it down.
    Eliminate those subjects which are not particularly visual. For example,
    existential philosophy can be deleted. Then cut out those subjects which are
    impractical, for one reason or another. For example, I have always been
    fascinated by Patagonia but, as I live in Arizona, it is not a subject which I can
    shoot at available hours and weekends. The subject must not only be practical
    but also accessible. Also eliminate those subjects about which you are ignorant,
    at least until you have conducted a good deal of research into the issue. For
    example, you are not making any statement about urban poverty by wandering
    back streets and grabbing shots of derelicts in doorways. That's exploitation not
    exploration.
    Continue similar reductions in your list of interests until two or three subjects
    remains, all of which a.) fire your enthusiasm b.) lend themselves to images,
    as opposed to words c.) are continuously accessible.
    Let me give you an example. As a teacher I encounter a great number of
    photographic students who are active in college life, naturally emotional about
    many aspects of education, and who spend the greater part of their waking life
    on campus. But in the past 15 years, and over 1,000 students later, I have
    never seen a photographic project based on what it is like to be a college
    student. In fact, it is rare indeed to see a photographic student carrying
    a camera.
    Instead, they select subjects which they assume their professors (or the art
    community at large) expect from a photographer and wonder why they cannot
    sustain any interest in making pictures. Photography has become a gradeproducing
    chore and the thrill of visually confronting the world has lost its sharp
    edge of discovery, the original reason, perhaps, why the student became a
    photographer.
    But back to the list. . . with some hesitancy, I admit, I would recommend one
    further elimination process. It is this. When you have two or three visually
    possible and accessible subjects, all of which interest you equally, it is no
    compromise to select the subject which others are more interested in viewing.
    The state of being human dictates that some things are visually more interesting
    than others.
    As a lecturer, I am well aware that, it is difficult to transmit information to a
    disinterested, bored audience. You must engage and hold the audience's
    attention before the content can flow. It is the same with images. Just be
    aware that some subjects are more accessible and interesting to the lay person
    than others - and it is deliberately perverse to ignore this consideration. There is
    a very fine line between pandering to popular appeal and a respectful
    consideration of viewers’ interests, and only the integrity of the photographer will
    hold the balance.
    All this talk about emphasizing subject matter might indicate that I am only
    advocating a strict, straight recording of objects. But this is not so. I have been
    talking about starting points. I do believe that the narrower and more clearly
    defined the subject matter, the more scope there is for a continuing evolution of
    complexity and, hence, the greater the latitude for personal interpretation. An
    analogy might help to explain my point.
    I have recently relandscaped my front yard and now need to plant trees. I could
    have an "instant" tree by collecting an assortment of trunks, branches, twigs and
    leaves and assembling the parts. But the tree would be dead. The starting
    point for a living, growing tree is a seed or a sapling. Then by careful nurturing,
    and a good deal of patience, a tree will grow - often into a form which could not
    have been foreseen.
    It is the same with a body of work, of any merit, in photography. The greatest
    scope for deep-rooted, organic growth begins with the most simple premise.
    The alternative is a frantic grasping for instant gratification which merely leads to
    works displaying visual pyrotechnics but of dubious depth and resonance. This
    is the fallacy of form. Young photographers are often pressured into an
    emphasis on individual style, a search for distinction, a quest for newness and
    differentness. Yet the truth of the matter is that a unique style is a byproduct of
    visual exploration, not its goal. Personal vision only comes from not aiming for
    it. In dim light, objects emerge from the gloom when not looking at them. It is
    the same with style; paradoxically, it is a natural, inevitable result of emphasizing
    subject, not self.
    And this principle brings up an equally important correlation between subject and
    self. If it is perceived to be important that the self should be ultimately revealed,
    the question arises: What is the nature of this "self"? If the self is shallow, narrow
    and inconsequential, so will be the resultant photographs. It seems an
    extraordinary presumption that every photographer has a depth of character
    which demands revelation!
    Inevitably, most photographers would do the world a favor by diminishing, not
    augmenting, the role of self and, as much as possible, emphasizing subject
    alone. This is not meant to be facetious. Such photographers would be
    members of an august group - the majority of photographers throughout the
    medium's history, most of whom remain unknown as personalities. However,
    the emphasis today is on a cult of personality and individualism, and I presume
    that the majority of young photographers who encounter these words are anxious
    to assert self. Like all noble aims, however, it is not achieved without varying
    degrees of responsibility and hard work. The young photographer must develop
    a photographic conscience.
    What I mean by this term is this: If the subject of the photograph is the vehicle for
    profounder issues, then it is the photographer's responsibility to think and feel
    more deeply about those issues. That sounds self-evident. But how is it
    achieved? By a seriousness of spirit. And how is that achieved? By engaging on
    a quest for self-knowledge which invests the act of living with greater energy and
    commitment. I am well aware that this sounds very nebulous. You cannot
    wake up one morning and assert: today I will be aware and more alive. It starts
    like self-expression, with a concentration of focus - on the subject matter. It
    presumes that the subject deserves not only looking, but also thinking, reading,
    writing, talking as well as photographing - earnestly and energetically.
    I once watched a television interview with a great violinist. The interviewer
    asked him to describe a typical day. The musician said he read scores over
    breakfast, then composed music in the morning, thought about music during a
    walk, practiced the violin in the afternoon, played in a concert in the evening, met
    with musician friends to play together, then went to bed dreaming of the violin.
    The interviewer was aghast - it seemed such a narrow life. "Yes," said the
    violinist, "Initially my life was becoming narrower and narrower in focus. But
    then something extraordinary happened. It is as though my music passed
    through the tiny hole in an hour glass and it has since become broader and
    broader. Now my music is making connections with every aspect of life. "
    In this sense photographers are photographers one hundred per cent of the time,
    even when washing dishes. The ultimate aim is an oscillation between self and
    subject with the image being a physical manifestation of this supercharged
    interface between the spirit and the world.
    It demands reiteration: this conscience of the photographer is not learned, not
    appropriated, not discovered, not acquired quickly or without effort. It is a
    function of the photographer's life. And it begins with an intense examination of
    The Thing Itself.
    If this presumes too much, I make no apologies. The young photographer,
    unwilling to develop such a conscience, can always move on to some other
    activity, without failure or shame, or join the army of hobbyists who derive great
    pleasure from their images, or employ the medium in its honorable role of
    documentation without artistic presumption. My concern is with those who
    engage in artistic posturing and shallow assumptions, using photography as if it
    was a clever trick and employing stylistic devices in a sleight of hand which
    deceives the eye.
    An earnest and honest appreciation of subject matter is the genesis of a clearer,
    deeper vision. Photography is rooted in The Thing Itself.
    This article has been reproduced more often than any other piece I have written. I think it was first
    published in Newsletter, Daytona Beach Community College, in 1988 - but it is still being used by and
    copied for college students at the time of posting, 2006.


    ENJOY! -da-da-
     
  13. georgiv

    georgiv New Member

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    propun sa dam si un premiu pt cel ce se incumeta sa citeasca tot, asa sa-l ambitionam! -nu-ma-uit-
     
  14. AlinaPink

    AlinaPink New Member

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    Am postat articolul pt cei ce sunt intr-adevar interesati...
    Cel ce nu citeste are de pierdut... acum, na! -dans-
     
  15. georgiv

    georgiv New Member

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    De cel interesat ziceai ca pierde ... nu? -nu-ma-uit-
    Ce bine! nu intru in categorie! -obosit-

    tot poze cu luna, se pun?
     
  16. florin_mol

    florin_mol New Member

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    A fost lung dar a meritat.
    Intr-adevat articolul e prea deep pentru acest topic.
    Lumea pune aici mai mult poze decat fotografii, dar e ok chiar si asa.
    Fotografia daca o faci o faci pentru tine nu o faci pentru audienta. Marii artisti nu au creat pentru a vinde. Probabil de asta se gaseste atata originalitate in lucrarile lor.
    Asta se intampla si in alte arte ca de exemplu muzica. Toata muzica din ziua de azi are un singur subiect dragostea. Nu se canta despre nimic altceva. In incercarea disperata de a vinde sunt excitate instinctele primare ale individului. Nu stiu daca in timp asta nu va duce la o desensibilizare sau o saturatie. Dar avand in vedere ca se manipuleaza un instinct primar sunt mari sanse ca acest trend sa continue pentru multa vreme intr-o lume in care lumea are acces mai usor la divertisment decat la educatie.
    Sunt interesat de fotografia de nunta in special insa cu cat mai mult ma uit si ma expun la imagini imi dau seama ca mai toate arata la fel. Foarte rar intalnesti o fotografie care sa ma surprinda. Posibil ca nunta in sine sa devina un subiect oarecum banal.
     
  17. catad

    catad Active Member

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    m-ao omorat cu "deep" asta. toate si toti sunt deep. Mai schimba cu altceva.
     
  18. dromaderu

    dromaderu Active Member

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    Da tizule,...
    cand am citit , la munca fiind, pe mobil deci, aceasta replica,

    am avut o stare cumva de perplexitate...

    Adica, din ce inteleg eu, acest articol depaseste nivelul de intelegere al celor ce pun poze pe aici...

    Multam oricum pt articol!Alina.
     
  19. florin_mol

    florin_mol New Member

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    Nu e e o ofensa la adresa nimanui.
    Eu de exemplu recunosc ca jazzul este o muzica pentru oameni care au un simt al muzicii cultivat insa nu ma simt ofensat in vreun fel prin faptul ca mie nu-mi suna bine muzica respectiva care este aritmica si nu-mi transmite nici un mesaj. Nu e un nivel superior al gandirii ci doar un alt nivel.
    Suntem toti diferiti trebuie sa intelegem asta.
    Toti suntem buni si ne-am nascuti perfecti inca din prima zi.
     
  20. dromaderu

    dromaderu Active Member

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    Florine, este o diferenta intre ce scrii si, ce gandesti (sper)

    Tu posibil sa nu o vezi ca fiind o ofensa insa, altii au perceput-o asa.

    Chiar faptul ca faci o diferenta intre cei ce "pun poze" si artistii (eventuali) ce " pun fotografii"

    tot pe acolo este ...
     

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