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Sa mai bem un paharel/sa ne veselim nitel

Discussion in 'SEZATOARE' started by dromaderu, Aug 5, 2011.

  1. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Johnnie Walker Platinum -bravo-


    '' Johnnie Walker Platinum Label is a rich and contemporary blended Scotch Whisky inspired by the Walker family's tradition of crafting 'private blends' for directors of its company and for special occasions. The Master Blender has crafted a contemporary 18 year old Scotch Whisky for today's sophisticated consumer and is rich and refined - a symbol of style that rewards those who take the time to savour it. The trademark Johnnie Walker smokiness is entrenched in this whisky that strongly embodies the sweet and elegant Speyside style. Crafted from single malt and grain whiskies, Platinum is a complex blend with deep layers of balanced flavours of both whisky and wood in which it has rested for a minimum of 18 years.

    Nose
    Sherry, oak, chocolate fondue, wet leaves, loam, mint.

    Palate
    Blood oranges, sherry, rosewater, dark plums, raspberries.

    Finish
    Salt, very subtle smoke (methinks Talisker), and crisp red grapes.

    General Impressions
    The first couple of sips are accompanied by some feisty spiciness, but that settles down to a red fruit, sherry infused taste experience that is very satisfying. Very quaff-able. Very smooth. Goes down way too easy.

    Blended scotch consumers place a premium on smoothness above all other qualities. Platinum Label delivers. There are no sharp or pointed sticks here. It's all velvet pillows and satin sheets. Trouble is, when a blend is that smooth, it has to sacrifice complexity of flavor. That's what has happened here.



    Normally, I wouldn't hold a blended Scotch whisky up to a naked light bulb and handcuff it to the chair of tough questions of complexity. But, Platinum Label is deserving of such an interrogation because of the price point. In Canada, this blend retails for the borderline criminal sum of $149.00. In my opinion, any Scotch whisky, single malt or blended, has to display an appreciable complexity of flavor that makes me go "wow!" at that price.

    Not happening here.

    Don't misunderstand me.

    This is good, solid, premium blended Scotch whisky.

    I enjoy it. But, the price of $149 is ridiculous (and maybe capable of tempting a prosecutor to lay a charge of larceny).

    A good friend of mine, on his way to Isleworth picked this bottle up for me at Duty Free in Orlando, Florida for about $85. I paid him back, so I am doing some serious Deep Blue value-for-money calculations, and I am still unsure whether or not it is worth it. Well, actually, that is not entirely true.



    Drinking Platinum Label brings to mind an old Barry Goldwater campaign billboard, that read: "In your heart you know he's right." Similarly, in my heart, I know I'm right when I think I am paying too much for Platinum Label, even at Duty Free prices. I think this should be priced at about $60.

    Target Market
    So far, we have established that Johnnie Walker Platinum Label is a good blended Scotch whisky, very drinkable, pleasant and pretty solid. Unfortunately, due to the high price, we whisky nuts demand some complexity. This is because for the same amount of money there are other blends (ie. Hibiki 17, 21, Johnnie Walker Green, etc) that are priced lower and deliver magical complexity. Moreover, for much less money we can buy single malts that deliver pixies who dance on our palates doing nude interpretive dances that leave nothing to the imagination.

    So, who buys Platinum?

    Probably not whisky aficionados seeking a good value for money proposition.

    I know that there are a lot of affluent, casual consumers of Scotch whisky who would bring out this premium blend during the holidays or in moments of celebration (weddings!). These consumers want a smooth, pleasant, non-offensive whisky experience, and at the same time they want to demonstrate to their friends and family that they have the means to buy the best. The handsome packaging, the high price, the lofty age statement and the precious metals marketing slant all satisfy that expectation. I speculate that this would be a very desirable bottle in countries whose economies have an emerging middles class who want to announce that they have "arrived." I am thinking: China, Russia, Brazil, India, and many others.

    I am also thinking so called mature economies like Canada, United States, England and others also have plenty of consumers who want the same assurances and a need to make the same declaration.



    Good for them! I just hope I get invited to their next wedding celebration where the Platinum Label flows! ''
     
  2. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Johnnie Walker Gold -asa-asa-


    '' The Johnnie Walker product line is easy to understand. Certain labels denote the level of quality of the relevant blended whisky. Red Label is the entry level offering, drunk by itself is a pleasant endeavour, and so, very suitable for adding soda or making mixed drinks. At the opposite end of the spectrum is the Blue Label, a blend of scotch whiskies up to 40 yrs of age, sourcing single malts of distilleries that are no longer in operation. In between these two extremes are: Black, Green and Gold labels. As you can see, the Gold Label falls just before the zenith of scotch blends, Johnnie Walker Blue Label. So, the question that arises: Is Gold Label that good? And the answer is . . . yes, it is. Very good indeed.


    It was introduced into the market place in 1995. Little advertising on TV and in magazines in the US. Advertising is considerable in the Far East where Johnnie Walker enjoys a huge following. China, Japan, Singapore, Thailand are filled with ads of this scotch.


    In North America, the price of Gold Label, I think causes consumers to opt for single malt over it. In any case, despite the lack of profile and advertising in North America, it is well worth discovering.



    Gold Label Composition

    The Gold Label is made up of a combination of grain and single malt whiskies having a minimum age of 15yrs in casks, prior to actual bottling. Remember scotch, unlike wine, does not improve with age once bottled. At the core of this blend are a number of single malts that are purported to be quite scarce. Specifically, Clynelish which is distilled from spring water that supposedly runs through veins of gold. I am frankly a little sceptical, and do not think that water passing by or through veins of gold will actually impart a distinctive flavor. Anyway, the bottom line is tha this blend is made up of high quality and obscure single malts. Diageo (the company that owns Johnnie Walker) is very guarded as to the contents of this blend. In my humble opinon, there are two reasons: first, they want to minimize competition; and secondly, there may be more grain whisky than people would expect, that if divulged might negatively impact sales.


    Nose

    I could nose this scotch for hours. There is so much there and you just know they spent a bloody fortune trying to get the scents just right. I am a guy who is not particularly concerned with interior decor or the color of my socks in relation to my suit, but this scotch, I am fascinated by the scents it gives. Its like sniffing a rose, and coming back over and over. Even my wife sniffed it and was shocked it was scotch. There is a lot going on, specifically, the scent of fresh bread, roses, and other flowers that frankly smell nice, but don't have a clue to identify. If this is a gift, your recipient will be impressed upon nosing this blend.



    Suggested Serving

    This is not to be drank with anything more than a drop or two of distilled water or a single ice cube. If you consult the Johnnie Walker US website, you will be advised to try the Gold Label by freezing a shot in a glass in your freezer for 24 hours. Dont worry, due to the alcohol content, it doesnt freeze, but it does thicken. A sip of this scotch that has been subjected to your freezer for 24 hrs results is a scotch that upon sipping, in a chilled tumbler, provides a concentrated dram of honey and heather. I tried freezing a shot in a tumbler and then sipping and must say I was impressed. I chased a sip with some milk chocolate and was in awe. It transforms from a scotch to a dessert liqueur almost.


    Palate

    This is a gentle, soft introduction to a sophisticated honeyed dram. The honey is presented libereally on the palate, but mixed in with notes of heather, rich cream, spicy cinnamon, zing of candy cane, faint reverberations of peat and whisps of smoke. A wrapping of flavors that can be truly called complex. There is no burn or roughness here. You know upon your first sip that you are experiencing a high quality blend of spice, honey, smoke and peat in a flavor wrapping like no other.


    Finish

    If you tried it after being in the freezer for 24hrs, the flavors will linger much longer than if served neat at room temperature. Frozen, you will swallow, and minutes later you will still be able to taste the honey, heather, peat and smoke in that unique envelope of single malts and blends. The warming affect of your mouth upon the chilled scotch is truly very pleasing and unique.



    Served neat, the flavor remains upon being swallowed, but does not linger as long as when served frozen and in a chilled tumbler. I realize that it is outrageous to serve scotch after having been in a freezer for 24 hours but it does work in this case.



    General Impressions

    Johnnie Walker Gold Label is to be served on special occasions for people who will appreciate a complex, honeyed, refined and very smooth dram. If you graduate from university and your parents choosing to serve this, they are on the mark. If you are in the bar at 2 am and contemplating taking a leak in the dumpster outside with your college buddies, you have missed the mark by a wide margin.'Smooth' and 'honey' in a complex wrapping of flavor is what I think of when considering this scotch. The only negative comment I have is with respect to the tail end of the tasting or finish. I pick up some heather or mint that is a little off. It annoys me a bit, but I am being very fussy and only a couple of my connosieur friends agree with me on this point. ''
     
  3. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Ron Millonario XO Reserva Especial Rum -bravo-



    '' Ron Millonario XO Reserva Especial Rum is a new rum which has entered the Alberta marketplace from Peru. It was extremely hard to research this rum as not even the Ron Millonario Website has any information about it. The website does speak of three old Scottish column stills and a slow distillation process used to produce their rum from sugar cane molasses, although the distillery which produces the rum is not mentioned (only that it can be found in the North of Peru). It is implied that this distillery uses its own specially selected yeasts in the fermentation process, and mention is made of the distillery’s own coopers who construct their own aging barrels from American and Slavonian oak.

    The younger Ron Millonario Solera 15 Reserva Especial is mentioned and we can probably deduce some important information about the Ron Millonario XO from its younger sibling. The Solera 15 Reserva is produced from a 4 stage Solera process with the final stage bringing the oldest rum in the blend to 15 years. It may be reasonable to assume that for the XO a fifth Solera stage is introduced bring the oldest rum in the blend to somewhere in the 18 to 21 year range, although I have heard claims that the oldest rum in the blend may be as old as 30 years. (I find these claims unlikely, although it is possible.)

    Although specifics about Ron Millonario XO Reserva Especial Rum are hard to find, it does give me an opportunity to review the spirit with very few preconceptions.


    In the Bottle 5/5

    The Ron Millonario Rum is presented in the attractive rectangular decanter shown to the left. I have seen a cardboard display sleeve in a few of the retail stores as well although I do not have a picture to show you. I think this decanter really dresses up the rum, and it has a nice visual appeal in my rum cabinet. The top closure is corked, and the opening the bottle gives us that nice satisfying ‘pop’ sound that everyone loves.


    In the Glass 9.5/10

    The rum displays itself with a rich brown caramel colour in the glass, and the immediate nose is of spiced oak, lots of dark caramel and some nice rich cigar tobacco. When I tilt and swirl the glass I am greeted by thick droopy legs which move rather slowly back into the glass.

    As the glass breathes baking spices build with luxurious scents of vanilla, dark brown sugar, cinnamon, cloves and allspice. I seem to be catching hints of dry fruit which are sort of reminiscent of Christmas fruit cake. My sense is that the aroma is very well balanced. The oak spices build alongside the sweeter baking spices, and I have to admit that I am eager to take a sip.


    In the Mouth 57/60

    When I took my first sip of this rum, my immediate reaction what to exclaim, “Oh, that is lovely!” and subsequent sips and samplings have done nothing to dissuade me from this initial reaction. The main flavours of caramel/molasses, oak spice and baking spices seem to be perfectly melded together. Hints of raisin, figs, tobacco and chocolate seem to provide just the right accent to make this a suave mouth watering rum. There is plenty of sweetness, but this sweetness is tempered by the more pungent flavours such that the rum never seems to be too sweet, it just seems delicious.

    I taste a light impression of roasted walnut underneath, perhaps a bit of marmalade and marzipan as well, and even some coffee and cola make their way into the flavour profile. The rum is simply delightful!


    In the Throat 14/15

    Sweet fruit filled baking spices leave their lingering mark as the rum exits with a long smooth satisfying finish. The pungency of allspice and nutmeg seems to be perfectly balanced against the sweetness of brown sugar and the heat of oak spice.


    The Afterburn 9.5/10

    This is one of those really special rums that scores up in the stratosphere for me. The rum has it all, great depth of flavour, wonderful consistency from nose to mouth to finish, and wonderful balance between all of its elements. I simply love it. ''
     
  4. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Godet Epicure Folle Blanche Cognac -asa-asa-


    '' One of Godet's top Cognacs, Epicure was distilled from the Folle Blanche grape, and it has been aged in oak for 25 years.

    A creamy, velvety soft spirit with oodles of rich flavour. Very good indeed.

    A must for connoisseurs! ''
     
  5. dromaderu

    dromaderu Active Member

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    Bun!
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    Scuze, camera mica, a trebuit sa iasa si moi in poza,
    romul e super, aia in duty free mi l-au recomandat..."the best in the world".
    Bun!
     
  6. catad

    catad Active Member

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    Se vede tizule pe fata ta cat de greu ti-a fost. Of, of.
     
  7. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Havana Club 7 years old Cuban Rum -ras2-



    '' Sometimes when I take the first sip of new rum, I close my eyes; and I let the rum show me where it belongs. This rum brought me to an old tavern, close to the docks. The kind of place you see in old movies where the rum flows and stories get taller in the telling. The place has an oily, tobacco stained floor. Cigarette smoke drifts up to the ceiling mingling here and there with the occasional smell of a Cuban cigar. A girl sits on a boardwalk stage, singing slightly out of key, as the patrons in the tavern pay more attention to their stories than to her. A burly bartender, who looks like he can handle whatever trouble comes his way, wipes the sweat from his brow, and then with the same towel wipes the bar-top. He glances at me playing solitaire in the corner of the room and sipping the rum he served me. I had told him I would stay and pay him well if the rum was good. He served me a soft oily, smoky rum called Havana Club. I smile… the tip will be generous tonight.


    In the Bottle: 4/5

    The Havana Club 7 year old rum arrives in a tall slender brown bottle. The Havana Club label is bold and assertive with an eye catching style. This presentation is solid except for the pressed on screw cap. I have come around a little in recent months to the acceptance of plastic screw caps, but I still believe the pressed on metal caps are inferior. I have had too many which did not properly reseal my bottle. I am not a fan of plastic diffusers in the bottle top either. I was told that the purpose of the diffuser is so that bartenders cannot refill the bottle with an inferior spirit and then place it back on the shelf. My experience is that the diffuser just makes it harder for me to get my rum out of the bottle. I think that if a company can take the time to relabel a bottle in French and English for the Canadian market, they can take the time to eliminate the annoying diffusers for that same market as well. The last time I checked, there was not a huge problem with Canadian bartenders trying to refill there expensive bottles with inferior rum. Maybe I am misinformed.


    In the Glass 8.5/10

    I am a fan of long slender legs that move slowly and gracefully. This is exactly what I see in my glass after I give it a small swirl with the Havana Club rum. The side of the glass carries a lot of oil, and the rum is sure to have a long finish. The rum is a little darker perhaps than I was expecting. It has a look of richness that is very inviting.

    The nose displays a moderate amount of smoke which seems to subdue the aroma from the glass to a certain extent. Over time, molasses, dark brown sugary baking spices, dried fruit (raisins and prunes) and a lurking tobacco all find their way out of the glass and into my nostrils. I would have scored this a little higher had the nose been more assertive.


    In the Mouth 51/60

    This is not a clean, crisp rum barreled in American oak and bottled with that smooth tinge of left over bourbon. This is a molasses filled rum with an unmistakable smoky character. The molasses carries a lot of sweetness forward into the smoke with prunes, raisins, and dates dancing in the wisps. Leathery tobacco crouches in the smoke adding a slightly bitter counter punch to the molasses sweetness.

    Hot oak spices provide a bridge between the bitter and the sweet, but it is and odd union, with a certain metallic strangeness attached to the flavours that is hard to identify, but there nonetheless. The rum fits that tavern I described earlier. It is a rum for smoke filled rooms where men swap tall stories of adventure, or play solitaire depending upon their company and their mood.


    In the Throat 12/15

    The rum fills my throat with smoke and finishes with that odd lingering metallic taste. The sweetness from the molasses has become cloying, and the oak spice carries more odd flavours of grassy green tobacco and subtle hints of sulpher. Strangely, this is nicer than it sounds.


    The Afterburn 8/10

    I can see why this is a favoured rum on forums and chat rooms around the internet. It is dark and rich and carries a full round flavour profile compared to other rums in its price range. It has a soft oil and a tobacco richness. It is right at home in the taverns where the stories are tall and the air is thick . There are times when I really enjoy that particular style of ambiance and atmosphere. The next time I am in that mood, this will be the rum I sip. ''
     
  8. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Santa Marta Limoncello -nu-ma-uit-


    '' Santa Marta Limoncello D'Italiaa Limoncello from Italy is a delicious, tart yet sweet, lemony Italian liqueur. With an intense lemon-green colour and powerful citrus aromas, Limoncello is delightfully sweet, with a refreshingly crisp finish. To enjoy this tongue tingling liqueur at its very best, keep the bottle in the freezer and sip it ice-cold from a shot glass or serve as a treat poured over ice-cream. Limoncello is a lemon liqueur; a digestif made only in the south of Italy around the Gulf of Naples, along the Amalfi Coast and on the islands of Ischia, Capri and Sicily.

    A gorgeous Limoncello from Santa Marta. This is crisp, tangy and it has an incredibly fresh tasting lemon flavour. Can't recommend it enough! ''
     
  9. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Un vin bun pentru doza zilnica -nu-ma-uit-


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  10. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Highland Park 12yo -asa-asa-


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    '' "Rex, do you have a moment?"


    "Sure." He pushed himself away from his expansive desk, and leaned back in his chair, a battered, cracked brown leather number that had seen better days. Being vice-president, he could afford better, but his personal sense of frugality blinded him to such unimportant matters of aesthetics.


    "Take a look at this." I handed him a typed letter. He scanned it and looked up with a quizzical expression.


    "See here." I pointed out a spelling error. "And here, and that one too. I must bounce back a couple letters a day to Joan."


    Joan was a 60ish secretary, with alarmingly unnatural blonde, Marilyn Monroe hair, who transcribed my dictation at a breezy 20 words per minute. She was forgetful at times, failing to photocopy correspondence too.


    "Jason, I hear ya." He scratched his balding head and searched for the right words, and then added "but, . . . everyone needs a job."



    . . .



    Do you climb the corporate ladder with integrity?


    25 years ago, those words went straight over my head. I was fixated on the fact that I had a dud of a secretary. Me, an eager-beaver, know-it-all, newly minted university graduate. What did I know? Nothing. Absolutely nothing.



    Over the years, I have dealt with people who take liberties with the truth, twist facts and situations to their own advantage, and generally just plain lie. Sadly, sometimes they have been coworkers, bosses and senior management. Today, at 46 years of age, I can finally look a man in the eye and tell if he has good character. Unfortunately, the last time I encountered moral courage to do the right thing in the workplace was a quarter of a century ago. And this thought brings to mind Highland Park 12 years.



    Highland Park 12 years Single Malt Scotch Whisky

    Unlike men, whisky cannot lie. If it is thin, weak, unreliable, you will know from the first sip. Cheap, dishonestly young malt and grain whiskies cannot hide their shortcomings behind slick packaging, much like corporate weasels and c-suite yes-men using opaque jargon and jingoism to obfuscate the truth. The listener knows the truth behind words like downsizing, streamlining, change management, finding efficiencies and other corporate Orwellian gobbledygook that always means the same thing: loss of jobs that impacts not just the person in the position, but his/her family. Strangely the suit delivering the message always finds these "efficiencies" in the lower strata of the organization, not at his or higher levels of management.



    Nose (undiluted)

    Fine sherry, Florida oranges, majestic Orcadian peat, subtle wood smoke, and a handful of stones.



    Palate (undiluted)

    The finest Oloroso sherry, orange rind, raspberries, wild honey, and a thin layer of pomegranate. Underneath all that is heather and subtle Montecristo smoke. Great and a very unique floral complexity for a 12 year old single malt.



    Finish (undiluted)

    Dry, tingling pomegranate, Australian red licorice and the distinctive heather of this distillery that cannot be replicated by any other distillery.



    General Impressions

    Highland Park 12 years is a solid drink. A single malt whisky that cannot be ignored. It exemplifies all that great malts aspire to be. For example, a lot of single malts trumpet that they age in Oloroso sherry casks. If there was ever a word consistently over-used in Scotch whisky marketing, it is "Oloroso." Oloroso sherry is a dry sherry. Tends to be very dry and you taste that arid quality on the mid-palate to finish of Highland Park 12.

    The Oloroso sherry casks used by Highland Park are exceptional to my mind. They deliver a fantastic sherried Scotch whisky experience that other distilleries can only dream about.




    Scottish Heather (Calluna vulgaris)

    The other feature of Highland Park 12 that I take note of is 'heather.' What is heather?

    It is a low lying shrub that grows all over Scotland and typically is mauve, lavender and purple in color. Orkney Islands where the Highland Park Distillery is located has plenty of heather too.

    I seriously believe that heather of Orkney does impart unique and rare floral notes that make Highland Park 12 special. The mechanics of exactly how this shrub influences flavor, I will admit is sketchy at best.

    ". . . water flowing over heather moors picks up floral characteristics along its way to the distillery, and exerts an influence during the steeping or mashing. However, using peat that includes heather, certain types of yeast, a particular distillation method, and oak aging may all impart heather characteristics to whisky."

    Those are the words of Ian Wisniewski, a whisky writer, whose above comments appeared on page 32 of Whiskey by Michael Jackson, 2005 edition, published by Dorling Kindersley Limited.

    I subscribe to Mr. Wisniewski's explanation. There is a fascinating floral experience going on in Highland Park 12 that I attribute to heather.



    Fair Price

    At one time Highland Park 12 was cheap. It didn't have the cachet of say Macallan 12 and others. So, the price was actually very good.

    Times have changed. HP 12 is now recognized as a great single malt and so I have noticed prices creeping up. I have been told that the higher prices reflect increased demand in India and China. In addition, I think it has become a trendy brand in North America. It is the name dropped most by people who know little about Scotch whisky but want to appear otherwise. In any case, the price for HP 12 is still more than fair, in spite of recent increases.


    Conclusion

    Back in 2009, I wrote an enthusiastic and maybe a bit over-the-top review of this single malt. I still agree with it.

    HP 12 has great character!

    The question is: do you and I? ''
     
  11. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Mount Gay Extra Old Barbados Rum -asa-asa-


    Bun, dar un gust putin amar...cineva a sugerat sa-i pun cateva picaturi de lamaie...da, doar asa este bun, acea amareala disparand...anyway, not impressed.


    '' The tradition of producing rum on Barbados has been dated to the early seventeenth century. In fact, there is evidence of small-scale distillation on Barbados as early as 1637. It is unclear from the evidence whether this early distillation can properly be called rum. However, the first recorded written usage of the word Rum Bullion appears on the Island in 1651. This is the earliest recorded usage of the word Rum as it relates to the distilled spirit anywhere in the world. Evidence dated to 1667 indicates that there were stills in use at the site which would become the Mount Gay Plantation. The first written evidence that a spirit called rum was produced at this site comes from the year 1703. This makes Mount Gay the earliest recorded commercial producer of rum in the world, and this also makes Mount Gay the oldest Rum Brand in the world. To highlight their unique place in history Mount Gay includes the year 1703 on every bottle of rum which they currently produce.

    The Mount Gay Extra Old Rum (MGXO) is produced in a traditional style using copper pot stills. The rum is double distilled and aged in American white oak barrels which were previously used to age Kentucky bourbon. This is a well aged rum with the blend consisting of a wide range of rums from 7 years of age up to 15 years of age.


    In the Bottle 5/5

    As I indicated in my earlier review of the Mount Gay Silver Eclipse, the Mount Gay Rum Company has a new sleek bottle design. The new bottle has a slim oval shape with a modern, contemporary look and feel. It has a nice ‘wow’ factor when it sits on the shelf next to the other rums in my collection. I find the new bottle design slick and attractive. The label has for the most part has remained the same acting as a bridge from the old style to the new.

    I am pleased that the closure for the Mount Gay Extra Old Rum bottle is a nice high density cork topper.


    In the Glass 9/10

    The Mount Gay Extra Old has a rich copper/bronze colour which upon pouring is already beginning to demonstrate a rich nose with a dark molasses toffee aroma rising up from the glass. When I give my glass a gentle tilt, and swirl the liquid slowly to cover the sides I am greeted with a thick oily sheen which imparts thick legs on the side of the glass.
    As the glass decants, the aroma sweetens and I can smell a sweeter brown sugar within the molasses as well as luxurious baking spices. As I continue to allow the nose to develop, I get additional scents of roasted marshmallows, oak spices, ripe fruit, and scattered tea leaves. Hints of faint copper-like scents, unsweetened cocoa and an indistinct cigar-like aroma are drifting in and out of the breezes. This is deep and complex.


    In the Mouth 50/60

    There is much to like about the MGXO. The flavours of rich molasses, ripe soft banana, baked apples and pears, canned peaches and apricots, and an abundance of dried fruit including raisins and currants, all dance on the palate. But (and I hate it when I have to say but), there is also a dank element lurking in the rum that tends to ambush these flavours. This dank element seems to contain deep charred flavours reminiscent of caramelized brown sugar, old musty leather, and damp tobacco. Although those particular flavours are not necessarily a detriment, in this case they contain a certain bitterness which is unpleasant.

    I tried adding ice to mute this aspect of the rum but it seemed instead to give more life to the bitterness. However, I did find success mixing with a touch of lemon juice. The acidic juice seemed to be just the complement needed to mute the bitter and make the rum extremely pleasing to my palate. This effect was consistent with or without ice added.


    In the Throat 11.5/15

    The Mount gay Extra Old packs quite a punch of flavour in both its delivery and in its finish. However, during the exit, the dank elements of the rum have taken over completely and the ending is bitter rather than sweet. Because of the wonderful complexity I want to score this higher, but I admit the bitter ending does me in.


    The Afterburn 8/10

    The Mount Gay Extra Old rum seems to win an award every time it is entered into a rum competition. Yet when I sampled and tried this well decorated rum I find the experience lessened by dankness and a swampy bitter ending. It makes me wonder whether it is a peculiarity of my palate that makes me taste this differently.

    To satisfy my curiosity I conducted a tasting of my sample bottle to several friends. They all tasted that same dank bitterness that I did. Mixed with a dash of lemon the rum is nice, but when sampled neat or with ice, and we all preferred to move down the Mount Gay ladder to the Mount Gay Eclipse.

    Mount Gay Extra Old is rich and complex and my rating score reflects this aspect of the rum. But the rum also ends on a bitter note and my rating must also reflect that aspect as well. ''
     
  12. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Ron Pampero Aniversario Reserva Exclusiva -asa-asa-


    '' A few years ago, I was a rum neophyte. I was a babe in the rummy wilderness, knowing only that I had tasted good rum, and I wanted to taste more. My collection? What collection? I probably had about 3 or 4 bottles of rum…mostly consisting of 2 or 3 bottles from St. Lucia and probably a bottle of Captain Morgan.

    Then one day a new bottle entered the fold. A gift was brought unto my household in the form of a squat little bottle from Venezuela, hidden inside of a leather sack. The rum, of course, was Ron Pampero Aniversario Reserva Exclusiva. Yes, all of that is the name of the rum. I’m not kidding. But, since you know me, I’m sure he’ll be cool with you just calling him Ron Pampero.

    Come to think of it, that would be a great name for a TV character or something. This summer Brad Pitt is: RON PAMPERO! *cue explosions*

    The rum was first introduced in 1963 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Pampero. The rum is aged in oak casks, but the bottle posseses no age statement, and the website for Pampero (which is actually run for them by Diageo) is essentially worthless when it comes to any real information on the rum. I kid you not when I say that I spent a significant amount of time digging through the dark recesses of the internet, braving the dark and dusty tubes that move information about, to figure out that the rum is a blend of rums aged from 2 years to 8 years. Many thanks to Cigar Aficionado for having that info when no one else seemed to.


    Appearances

    The Pampero is a dark, mahogany color. It’s a rich-looking rum…very inviting and it just looks like it will be warm and welcoming. The glass gets its required swirling and a nice sturdy rim appears and quickly gives rise to very strong, nice looking legs.


    Nose

    Moving right along, I brought the glass up and inhaled deeply of the rumly perfume. The nose is full and rich. Notes of cocoa are dominant at the front, with just a touch of vanilla. More nosing around and you can find hints of toffee and even a very slight hint of leather – and no I didn’t just drop the bottle’s sack into my glass. At least I don’t remember doing so. I generally don’t start making Leather & Rums until the bar is at a higher elevation than my head.


    Palate

    Through the lips and over the gums, watch out palate, here it comes. The spirit is light and warm on the tongue. It is smooth on the entry and finish. There’s almost no burn until it reaches your chest and gives it that lovely rummy warmth.

    The cocoa that I found in the nose is the first flavor to hit my tongue. It’s strong and rich, without being too sweet. There’s a little vanilla riding on top of this, as well as a hint of leather and a slight woodiness imparted by the oak barrels used for aging. The finish is buttery – slightly oily – with some smokey notes at the back.


    The Long & The Short Of It

    All in all, this is a rather simple-tasting rum. I know I’ve mentioned quite a few flavors…but it really took some searching for those to come through. The rum is predominantly cocoa, vanilla, and oak. There just doesn’t seem to be a great deal of complexity to this rum…which seemed a little disappointing. Not disappointing because the rum isn’t good. It is. It’s very good rum. There’s nothing wrong with simplicity. The disappointment stemmed more from this being one of the first truly good rums I had ever had, and now revisiting it with a slightly more evolved (i.e. snobby) palate yielded slightly less effusive results.

    Man that sounds like I didn’t like it. I DID! It’s a great rum. It’s incredibly sippable neat, or with an ice cube (I prefer neat), and it plays VERY well with others – allowing you to use it to make fantastic cocktails. If you want a simple cocktail to try with the Aniversario, try 2 oz of the Demon Rum in an Old Fashioned glass with ice and top off with real Jamaican ginger ale/beer and a small squeeze of lime juice. For a little extra pop, add a dash of bitters. It’s fantastically refreshing and easy to power through a number of them until you suddenly find yourself surrounded by empty ginger beer bottles and an empty bottle of Pampero. ''
     
  13. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    R.L.Seatle's 10 yo -bravo-



    '' And so my friends, TheFloatingRumShack.com draws to a close on its encounter with the three golden rums from Foursquare Distillery. We’ve tasted and enjoyed both Doorly’s 5 year old and XO and now we come along side Foursquares flagship rum, the award winning: R.L. Seale’s 10 year old. The bottle screams out for attention, but will the rum deliver on the bottles promise?

    I’ll put you out of your misery – YES – of course it does and on several levels which we’ll get to in a moment.

    I’m keen to not make every rum I write about be the most beautiful rum ever, but I will say that rum in general agrees with me. Regrettably I had a few rubbish rums as well and you probably will never hear about them here until:
    1.I know just what my position within the liable laws is and...
    2.I’m sure that I won’t upset anyone (too) important!



    The thing is that having had so many good experiences with Foursquare rums, I’m bound to be onto a winner and because I’ve only chosen to publish something about a select few (relatively speaking) of the ones that we’ve purchased, the odds on my subject matter being worthy are very high. So with that in mind, I'll press on.


    The moment we opened the bottle and took a sip we knew we were in for a treat. But before you even open the bottle you have a range of experiences to contend with. The bottle itself is best described as eclectic, or perhaps slightly bonkers... It’s definitely a unique design! ‘Melted’ springs to mind as does ‘why?’ I’m going to save actually asking the question until I meet Richard Seale in person next time. It is strangely ergonomic though. I wonder if the grip has something to do with assisting a pouring action?


    Other points worthy of note are the cork stopper and the natty gold ‘pirate’ badge on the front. The simplicity of the labelling works well and the black glass completes a pretty individual look and feel. This is not a bottle that is going to fade into the back ground in your collection.


    I have a confession (*) although I’ve seen the bottle on the back bar of many fine establishments, I never quite got around to taking a sip before now. But that aside: what about that first sip? Well... it was just amazing!


    I’ve returned to the bottle a few times since – I’m trying to live with a rum for a week or so before scribbling a few words down, so that I get a better feel for the style and taste. In fact as I’m in a mood for confessions – I will admit that between receiving the bottle and writing this, we had a party around our place - and just where was the bottle? Safely hidden away ‘sez I!’ I’m not ashamed either – when the ravening hordes descend – let them drink supermarket own-brand! Normally we share - in order to gauge reaction, but not this time!


    Having waxed lyrical about the taste – what about the taste? Its smooth. So very smooth. Rich in flavour – with dried fruit notes and all manner of loveliness! It slips down with an easy finish and you’ll find that you’re drinking a fine rum that will have you draining the glass and reaching for another before you realise you’re doing it! So with this in mind, perhaps ‘pleasurably dangerous’ should be added to the government health warning on the reverse of the bottle.


    I’ve not had the heart to mix this with anything not even an ice cube, so I can’t tell you what that might bring. I can’t see me doing that in the future either – so don’t ask.


    The important thing is that your taste buds will react differently to the same liquid depending upon time of day, mood, what you’ve just eaten and all manner of other reasons. The thing with this rum is that every time we’ve gone back to it; it’s been just as lovely as the time before. Perhaps not the ‘wow’ of the first time, but then familiarity comes into play as does such chemical reactions as oxidation which will change the nature of the beast. A lovely sipping rum that will be missed when the bottle has been emptied and extremely likely to be replaced at first opportunity.


    If you were thinking of getting yourself a bottle, then it appears to be listed on The Whisky Exchange for £28.50 and The Drink Shop for £30.94 – so splitting the difference, about thirty quid! This means it’s not super cheap, but equally it means that it’s not top end of the range – price wise this has competition, but it’s competitive and should therefore stand a chance of making it to your collection.


    BTW – the bottle strength of 43% ABV is the norm for Barbados and the exported version doesn’t deviate in this regard.


    At some point I’m going to have to spill the beans on some of the technical aspects of rum production at Foursquare – but this piece doesn’t seem the best place for it, so if you’ll let me, I’d like to come back to this sort of nerdiness in the future.


    Enough superlatives – we love this rum! ''
     
  14. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Dalmore 12 yo


    '' The infamous Dalmore - a compulsory stop along one's single malt journey. It's a bottle from the Single Malt Whisky Club in 2008 that like the Talisker, was sitting at the back of my cabinet for a few years waiting for my undivided attention prior tasting. Opened 2012-02-11.


    That colour is amazing. Bottle clearly states that caramel is added ("Mit Farbstoff") which gives it that deep, polished mahogany colour.


    Nose: First whiff is predominantly that of yeasty, cereally, "mealy" character. There's a hint of cabbage water about this too. Not really pleasant and quite unexpected. Not a great first impression. Once past the initial disappointment though, I pick up some winey, waxy and feinty notes under the yeasty surface in equal measure - the best parts being hints of praline, cream and cocoa. Opens up further with time in the glass (over one hour, during which I've had several sips!) to reveal a previously understated caramel sweetness which is quite pleasant. The yeastiness has faded considerably and I'm feeling a lot better about this malt. With water: Much the same, although, do I detect a hint of dried apple now?


    Taste: Really mellow, soft, non-descript start to this - had to make sure I actually took a sip there. I did indeed. Nothing is apparent at first impact. Not a single thing - it's all wrapped up in some kind of waxy packaging. Oh wait, some soft malty sweetness makes itself known. But where is the alcohol, anyway? Ahh here it comes, finally, arriving several seconds later. How bizarre. The first sip requires quite accentuated "swishing" around the mouth to reveal anything out of the soft haze. I get red wine, chewy bread, some tartness, a soft oak pepper spice finish as I swallow. Subsequent sips don't reveal anything new, but the alcohol comes quicker each time with fairly muted malt and sherry undercurrents throughout. With water: Seems to accentuate the spice on the palate and on the finish, might also be slightly sweeter as well.


    Finish: Menthol and oak spice linger for a very short while in an abbreviated finish. A mere hint of savoury saltiness left on my lips, now where did that come from? Odd. But quite more-ish.


    Balance: The nose itself offers quite some complexity, once the yeastiness is out of the way of course! There's about three layers to the nose which goes some way to explain the "haziness" on the palette, as if components are tightly integrated across the flavour spectrum and one must really concentrate to tease them out. I don't know whether this is a good thing in this particular malt, as for a 12 year old, I would expect vibrancy in the notes and some "character" whereas I'm only getting subdued, rather dull notes instead. Not sure what to make of all that.


    Overall, this is not bad. It has its moments and the nose is really the winner here (after the aforementioned yeastiness has dissipated). A testament to how hard I've been working (haha!) it's now been 1 hour and 50 minutes since I poured my dram and my initial disappointment has abated; I'm actually looking forward to my next pour from this bottle to see if there's any discernible improvement.





    Round two (@ 1 week, 2012-02-18)


    Nose: Slight yeastiness gives way to mint chocolate, leafy herbs, karinto (Japanese fried brown sugar coated snack), dark rum. Wow, this has really opened up now.


    Taste: Delivery now has bite and character. The meek, waxy delivery parcel has been torn away. Sweet demerara sugared malt accompanied by a good helping of woody spices and developing chili now kick in. Mouth-filling, engaging and robust delivery.


    Finish: Sherry-influenced spices trail off leaving dry, sweet malt, menthol and dark rum flavours in a short-medium finish. Very nice.


    Balance: That nose has increased in complexity and with dramatically scaled back yeastiness is now very agreeable indeed. Palette balance markedly improved with good malty hit and liberal spices to balance out the sweetness. Dalmore, take a bow. For an entry-level malt, this is great stuff.




    Round three (@ 1 month, 2012-03-12)


    Nose: Cookie dough, butter cream, brandy, golden syrup, dark chocolate, sultanas, pudding, rose petals. Slight yeastiness remains on first contact but dissipates as creamy sweet notes develop. Gorgeous nose. A hint of honeydew melon arrives later. There’s so much going on here, I’m nosing this “blind” but I think this is definitely better than it was previously. Top shelf nose. With water: Grass, menthol, mint and other greenery.


    Taste: Softly sweet, mellow oak, mouth coating smoothness, nutty oils, dark rum, bitter chocolate, toasted malt, spices. With water: Drowns the oils and brings out more bitterness - better without.


    Finish: Bitter dark chocolate accompanied by dry sherry, nutmeg and clove spices in a short but very enjoyable finish.


    Balance: Nothing out of place. No off notes besides slight yeastiness remaining in the nose upon first contact. A cozy, elegant sweetness on nose and palette - not severe vanilla or toffee but Christmas cake or pudding out of the oven.




    Round four (@ 3 months, 2012-05-11)


    Nose: The signature yeasty / bready note is still evident, but toned down and now inter-mingling effortlessly with smooth and sweet sherry notes as to make for a pleasant nose. I'm getting hints of chocolate cake, raisins, dark brown sugar, fudge, choc biscuits, coffee beans, leather and some tropical fruit note that I can't quite work out. Glorious - I could nose this for hours. It just gets sweeter with time in the glass, too.


    Taste: Interestingly the oak hits the palette first, riding on a wave of "spirity" malt, it's quite chewy and rich with sherry and chocolate present, there's a good helping of spices and just some tartness and tannins rounding it out. Some rough edges to this now - is it oxidation? It doesn't carry the telltale "fuzziness" I get with oxidised whiskies, so it could just be natural evolution - it's certainly not bad at all, quite good actually! On the evidence it's holding up quite nicely.


    Finish: Drying, tannic, bitter sweet (in a good way) as aforementioned flavours linger and pop out occasionally to say "g'day!". As per the palette, a little less elegant than memory serves but nonetheless provides a warming and lingering tasty finish.


    Balance: The dry sherry cuts through the sweetness of the nose and makes for a great dry/sweet combination. Palette is rich and robust and although less memorable than the nose it still delivers - the initial oak spice doesn't run away on the palette and is rather complemented adequately by sweet, tannic chewy malt and a nice tart "edge".



    Verdict

    I'll simply repeat what I wrote after the first week - Dalmore, take a bow. For an entry-level malt, this is great stuff! ''
     
  15. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Bunnahabhain Darach Ur


    '' The beautiful Island of Islay, also known as the Queen of the Hebrides, lies off the west coast of Scotland. With 8 working whisky distilleries, the stunning scenery, amazing wildlife and all the friendly people, Islay is a five star holiday destination.

    Bunnahabhain Distillery has sat proudly on the northern shore of Islay for over 125 years, quietly making a distinctly gentle single Islay Malt Whisky.

    Darach Ur is Scots Gaelic for ‘new oak,’ and this latest travel retail release from the Islay Distillery of Bunnahabhain and contains Whiskies up to 20 years of age, all matured in new oak barrels, sourced from a cooperage in Kentucky, U.S.A.


    The Whisky Boys know this great Distillery well as we have visited it on every trip to Islay we have made, and that is many.


    The Tasting


    Bunnahabhain Islay Single Malt Scotch Whisky Darach Ur 46.3 Alc/vol.


    Colour…Copper still orange.


    Nose…Certainly wakens up your nose with sweet seashore.


    Taste…Oaky and vanilla spice with dried fruit, the mild side of Islay, ever so smooth and gentle.


    Finish…Long and delicious, salty and Islay without the heavy smoke and peat, distilled only like an Islay can



    Well Islay did not let us down again, how do they do it, time after time they produce a grand dram, and this one is no exception.


    The only downside for our readers on this tasting is that you can only buy this dram at travel outlets and in 1 litre bottles, so if you are flying in or out of the country treat yourself to a bottle you will not be disappointed we can assure you.


    Happy dramming to you all. ''
     
  16. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Caorunn Gin -asa-asa-


    '' An unusual flavored, sophisticated and extremely pleasant gin. Great for Gin and Tonic and as a base for other gin-based cocktails.
    Gorgeous packaging and graphics. Every drinks cabinet should contain a bottle.


    •A crisp, dry, well balanced flavor.

    •Small batch distilled, hand crafted, Scottish Gin.

    •Uniquely made from five Celtic botanicals and Scottish spring water.

    •Botanical graphics influenced by the Scottish Art Nouveau movement.



    Caorunn Gin takes its name from the Rowan Berry - the botanical that forms the soul of the gin unlike many gins which are juniper based. Caorunn includes an organic blend of Coul Blush Apple, Heather, Bog Myrtle and Dandelion fused with six traditional gin botanicals.


    I tasted the gin on its own and 1 to 3 parts Schweppes tonic and lime. With tonic some of the subtle notes of the gin were lost and so next time I will use less tonic and as Caorunn recommends with a slice of apple not lime.


    Drunk on its own, the gin was crisp, dry and exceedingly well-balanced, rounded and soft yet still full-bodied.


    The packaging of the gin is far too lovely to tuck away in a drinks cabinet. The bottle is a pleasing and unusual shape - the base of the bottle is five sided to represent the 5 botanicals in the blend - with graphics influenced by the Scottish Art Nouveau movement.


    Tasting notes:

    Caorunn is a dry and crisp, naturally balanced gin. It is perfectly clear with a fresh, floral citrus, slightly spicy, aromatic aroma, a lean crisp taste and a long lasting, refreshing crisp finish.

    Celtic Botanicals
    Caorunn Gin is infused with five Celtic botanicals, including the fabled Rowan Berry.

    Traditional Botanicals
    Caorunn Gin contains six traditional botanicals including Juniper Berries, Orange Peel and Coriander Seed. ''
     
  17. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    The Botanist Islay Dry Gin -bravo-



    '' The Botanist is back with a brand new bottle!


    Made by the geniuses at the Bruichladdich distillery, the Islay gin is jam packed with a tasty selection of botanicals big enough to make any botanist swoon.

    Just in case you were curious about what goes into the gin, the new bottle features the names of all the botanicals etched into the glass.
    22 of the 31 botanicals are native to Islay, including wild Islay Juniper, giving us a real taste of the island that's neither a peated nor unpeated whisky.


    The list of native botanicals:

    Apple Mint Birch leaves, Bog Myrtle leaves, Chamomile (sweet), Creeping Thistle flowers, Elder flowers, Gorse flowers, Heather flowers, Hawthorn flowers, Juniper (prostrate) berries, Lady’s Bedstraw flowers, Lemon Balm, Meadow Sweet, Peppermint leaves, Mugwort leaves, Red Clover flowers, Sweet Cicely leaves, Tansy, Thyme leaves, Water Mint leaves, White Clover and Wood Sage leaves.

    Looking through the list, only the Juniper is a ‘normal’ gin botanical, and they supplement the gin with some more ‘traditional’ botanicals not found on the island:
    Angelica root, Cassia bark, Cinnamon bark, Coriander seed, Juniper berries, Lemon peel, Liquorice root, Orange peel and Orris root

    These are placed into a low pressure lomond pot-still, called ‘Ugly Betty’ and then distilled in a process that takes around three times longer than the traditional gin production process due to the low pressures they are operating at. This means that the gin is slowly simmering away for quite some time, assisting the release of the aromatics from the botanicals.


    When it comes to tasting, the first thing that hits you is that it’s a very complex gin. Quite simply with the number of botanicals it is no suprise that on the nose its hard to pick out the different aromas, the juniper is certainly dominant.
    When you consider that something like Gordon’s only has four botanicals, and most gin usually stopping at 10-12 botanicals then The Botanist is certainly something different.


    When sipped neat the flavours do come through, though I’m certain I couldn’t quite say what every botanical is bringing to the table through flavour. It’s got a depth and the high alcohol content is noticeable, it’s juniper led moving into citrus and some grassy essences – it keeps on giving and the flavours linger.. At the blind tasting this was a gin that was a divisor, partly due to the higher strength but also because whilst having those citrus hints it quite a spicy finish.

    It is a gin that you won’t find everywhere, and it will not please everyone but it’s certainly one I’m considering of getting another bottle of. It’s the first Islay Gin, but hopefully not the last that Bruichladdich produce.



    Nose: Enough botanicals to make us wish we had five noses. Big notes of citrus, delicate menthol and flowers everywhere!

    Palate: Cool at first. It quickly mellows out, warmth growing with citrus keeping it fresh throughout.

    Finish: Long, with a good spice.

    Overall: Islay isn't just about the whisky anymore. The Botanist Gin is top-notch! ''
     
  18. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    City of London Dry Gin -asa-asa-



    '' City of London Dry Gin (or COLD Gin) is distilled at the City of London Distillery, which is the first distillery to be commissioned in the City of London (or “The Square Mile”) for over 200 years – are you picking-up on the theme yet?

    The distillery has been created as a destination as much as a place to create gin. Not only is there a bar at the distillery but they do distillery tours, gin master-classes and corporate gin creation sessions, as well as making the venue available to hire for your own events. It really does seem to have made itself as accessible as possible to the general public and tried to tap into every possible revenue stream.

    The project is the brainchild of Jonathan Clark and Jamie Baxter, the latter being the master distiller that bought us Chase Vodka and William Chase Gin.

    While grain neutral spirit is bought-in, the rest of the distillation and bottling process happens on-site. The gin is bottled at 40% and at least two of the citrus fruits are used fresh.

    Botanicals…
    •Juniper
    •Coriander Seed
    •Angelica Root
    •Liquorice Root
    •Fresh Orange
    •Fresh Lemon
    •Pink Grapefruit

    The gin is not cheap; retailing at £32.50 from the distillery, it’s placing itself firmly in the top-tier price bracket (although, it is available a couple of quid cheaper elsewhere).


    City of London Dry Gin

    The bottle is a fairly standard heavy-bottomed round-shouldered affair but the dressing does set it apart from most. The neck is capped with a cork and then dipped in bright red wax (I love a wax topping). There’s a narrow, two-inch-wide label on the back of the bottle with an image of St. Paul’s Cathedral on the inside; when the bottle it full, the liquid magnifies this to fill the full width of the bottle, which is a really nice touch.

    Cutting into the wax and opening the bottle (small squeak, satisfying pop) and getting to grips with it, here’s what I found.


    Nose

    Giving COLD Gin a good sniffing reveals a heavy citrus load. The juniper is quite restrained but so is the alcohol. That’s about it.


    Neat

    Like the nose, the juniper in the neat gin is quite restrained. It carries a boat-load of citrus and there’s definitely some grapefruit in there. There’s also a hint of toffee-like vanilla (who knows where that came from). The alcohol is fairly well restrained.


    G&T

    Blimey! A Fever tree tonic really brings-out a torrential cascade of citrus. The grapefruit mentioned above really comes to the fore and the experience drips with different citrus fruits from a fresh and fruity attack right though to the slightly bitter, dry finish. The juniper is mild and takes a back-seat through the citrus-ride and there’s little spice or root flavours in evidence.

    There are a lot of similarities between this and Larios Gin but COLD Gin is obviously the better quality of the two. COLD is smoother and while it might be a little one-dimensional, it has a multifaceted one-dimensionality (which sounds a little counter-intuitive) that gives it a lot more depth and interest.
    However, it does have a much higher price-tag than Larios, and the big question in my mind is: does it warrant that steep ticket-price? I’m not convinced that it does; to my mind it should sit in the mid-twenties price bracket. It’s good but I don’t think it ranks up there with No.3 or Herno Juniper Cask, especially when Whitley Neill comes so much cheaper.
    Saying that, citrus-forward gins don’t float my boat like a juniper-forward gin does, so if your tastes favour citrus, then City of London Dry Gin might be worth the outlay. ''
     
  19. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Dupuy XO Tentation -nu-ma-uit-


    Superb, trebuie incercat!


    '' The story behind the brand is an interesting one. It was founded in 1905 by Thomas Bache-Gabrielsen, a Norwegian officer who came to France and bought the A. Edmond Dupuy cognac house. Bache-Gabrielsen settled there and married the daughter of a local wine producer.
    Today, their great grandson Hervé Bache-Gabrielsen runs the business, and maintains strong ties to Norway.
    For some reason, the cognac they produce is marketed as Bache-Gabrielsen in Scandinavia and the U.S., but as Dupuy in the rest of Europe.



    A luxuriously packaged XO Cognac from Dupuy, part of their Tentation range. Dupuy (aka Bache Gabrielson) is one of our favourite
    producers, with a reputation for exquisitely balanced cognacs - this will be excellent.

    IWSC 2012 - Gold Medal - Cognac


    This is truly exceptional stuff, incredible balance between fruit and wood, subtle and with a smoothness others would give their right arm for.

    OK, it's not cheap but then the best never is :) ''
     
  20. adicri

    adicri Active Member

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    Paul Beau Hors d'Age -asa-asa-


    '' The emphasis on ageing has worked well and this particularly fine 25 y.o.has developed a big complexity with aromas of orange peel, kumquats, guava, melon, dried nuts and much more.
    It's slightly higher strength of 43% enhances this cognac further.

    This is a wonderfully complex cognac with a multitude of aromas. Initially there is a deep smell of kumquats and dried mandarin skins.
    The nose develops to nutmeg, roasted almonds, vanilla, coffee and melon but one can sit all day imagining all the delicious rich smells which mature in the glass.


    True Grande Champagne core, ripe orange and tangerine fruit, cool minerals, white flowers, effortless freshness in spite of age (20-25 years in wood); there is some alcoholic heat on the nose however, a rough edge that continues on the palate, very good flavour intensity but also a hint of caramel; very good length with an alcoholic kick. Good stuff! ''
     

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